Quality Magnet Coin

applications | blockchain | copyright | Research Notes

The goal of Quality Magnet Coin QMC for short, is to build a large torrent magnet index that’s impossible to take offline, censor, or block.

The core idea is fairly straightforward. The application uses the blockchain to create a decentralized database of torrent magnet links which doesn’t rely on a hosting service or domain name, making it virtually impossible to take down

Cryptocurrency Startup Creates a Decentralized ‘Pirate Bay’ Alternative

SIDN : Transparantie in de muziekindustrie dankzij blockchain-technologie

applications | blockchain | copyright | related_projects | Research Notes

De muziekindustrie staat bekend als een harde wereld. Het is niet vanzelfsprekend dat je je brood kunt verdienen met muziek maken en helemaal niet voor jonge artiesten. De industrie wordt gekenmerkt door haar ingewikkelde, bureaucratische structuur. Een structuur waarin artiesten maanden moeten wachten op uitbetaling van royalty’s, waarin complexe contracten onvermijdelijk lijken en transparantie niet lijkt te bestaan. Dat moet toch anders? Volgens de initiatiefnemers van IBT Music kan dat. Teun van Eil, projectleider van het initiatief, legt uit hoe hun geautomatiseerde blockchain-systeem het verschil kan maken en transparantie brengt in de muziekindustrie.

Source: SIDN : Transparantie in de muziekindustrie dankzij blockchain-technologie

Digital Art as ‘Monetised Graphics’: Enforcing Intellectual Property on the Blockchain | SpringerLink

applications | blockchain | copyright | papers | Research Notes

In a global economic landscape of hyper-commodification and financialisation, efforts to assimilate digital art into the high-stakes commercial art market have so far been rather unsuccessful, presumably because digital artworks cannot easily assume the status of precious object worthy of collection. This essay explores the use of blockchain technologies in attempts to create proprietary digital art markets in which uncommodifiable digital artworks are financialised as artificially scarce commodities. Using the decentralisation techniques and distributed database protocols underlying current cryptocurrency technologies, such efforts, exemplified here by the platform Monegraph, tend to be presented as concerns with the interest of digital artists and with shifting ontologies of the contemporary work of art. I challenge this characterisation, and argue, in a discussion that combines aesthetic theory, legal and philosophical theories of intellectual property, rhetorical analysis and research in the political economy of new media, that the formation of proprietary digital art markets by emerging commercial platforms such as Monegraph constitutes a worrisome amplification of long-established, on-going efforts to fence in creative expression as private property. As I argue, the combination of blockchain-based protocols with established ambitions of intellectual property policy yields hybrid conceptual-computational financial technologies (such as self-enforcing smart contracts attached to digital artefacts) that are unlikely to empower artists but which serve to financialise digital creative practices as a whole, curtailing the critical potential of the digital as an inherently dynamic and potentially uncommodifiable mode of production and artistic expression.

Source: Digital Art as ‘Monetised Graphics’: Enforcing Intellectual Property on the Blockchain | SpringerLink

Our CPDP panel on blockchain and copyright is online

blockchain | copyright | critique | frontpage

Our CPDP 2018 blockchain and copyright panel with Ruslan Nurullaev (International Laboratory for Information Technology and Intellectual Property Law, Higher School of Economics), Primavera De Filippi (CNRS), Susana Nascimento (Joint Research Centre, European Commission), Guido Noto La Diega (Northumbria University), and Alexander Savelyev (Higher School of Economics) is online.

My slides are here:

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Course: Blockchain and Intellectual Property (26-10-2017) (Basic level)

blockchain | copyright | education programs | related_projects | Research Notes

On the 26 October 2017, the EUIPO brought together around 80 people to interact and discuss the implication of Blockchain technology on the world of intellectual property. Participants includes Blockchain experts, national IP offices, right holder representatives and representatives from civil society. The conference convered the basic concepts of the technology, the many aspects of interaction between the technology and intellectual property, 3 practical use cases and a look into the future.

Source: Course: Blockchain and Intellectual Property (26-10-2017) (Basic level)

Blockchain for Creative Industries | Middlesex University London

applications | copyright | papers | related_projects | Research Notes

The Blockchain for Creative Industries cluster comprises staff from the Faculty of Arts and Creative Industries, as well as from Science and Technology. We explore the disruptive, and enabling potential of blockchain technology for music, photography, art, fashion, film, journalism and gaming. As well as high-quality research outputs, the cluster is committed to teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Areas of interest include new business and economic models; creative entrepreneurship and artistic identity; copyright; visual analytics; and digital forensics. As well as exploring the considerable potential for innovation, we also look at barriers to adoption and possible disadvantages of this new technology – one some have suggested could be as significant as the World Wide Web.

Members of the cluster have been interviewed on behalf of the French Intellectual Property Office, and have taken part in round-table events alongside representatives of the Department of Work & Pensions and the Government Office for Science.

Cluster members have spoken at events organised by Blockchain Storm and the Bitcoin and Blockchain Leadership Forum, and at festivals including the Great Escape and Wilderness. We have also spoken internationally, at events including Distributed: Music in Nashville, USA, and as part of Global Entrepreneurship Week in Bergen, Norway. Cluster members have been interviewed on the BBC and written articles for publications including the Guardian, the Conversation and Distributed magazine.

Our Music on the Blockchain report, published in 2016, received extensive media coverage from publications including Music Week, Music 4.5, International Business Times, Tech City News, Cryptocoin News, City A.M., Fortune magazine, Huffington Post and Record of the Day. The report was launched at Sonos Studios in London, with leading figures in academia and industry.

The cluster is part of the Open Music Initiative, alongside Berklee, MIT, Harvard and UCL.