Curso experto legal en Blockchain, Smart Contracts e ICOs – 15 horas (24 – 26 enero 2018) – Blockchain España

Segunda edición del Curso experto Legal en blockchain, Smart Contracts e ICOs del 24 al 26 de enero de 2018Duración: 15 horas24 enero de 9.00-14.3025 enero de 17.00 – 22.0026 de enero de 9.30 a 14.00.Incluye dos Labs Prácticos, un caso de compraventa de vivienda en Smart contract y acceso a la comunidad de conocimiento de Blockchain España.PROGRAMA MÓDULO 1: Tecnología Blockchain, bitcoin, ethereum y principales retos jurídicos.MÓDULO 2: Identidad digitalLAB PRACTICO·         Cómo funciona el acceso·         Explora transacciones en una Blockchain.·         Usa una wallet.MÓDULO 3: Smart contracts.LAB PRACTICO·         Crear un Smart Contract con Solidity: Haz una compraventa de vivienda en Smart ContractMÓDULO 4: ICOS.MÓDULO 5: DAOs.**VER DETALLE DEL PROGRAMA ABAJOA QUIÉN VA DIRIGIDO?·         Abogados y profesionales del derecho.·         Miembros de la administración pública.·         Académicos y docentes.·         Empresas que estén valorando el lanzamiento de un proyecto Blockchain o una ICO.Precio 1.573 Euros (1300 + IVA)Inscripción: Envía un email a blockchainespana@gmail.comCurso presencial en Madrid. Espacio Impact Hub.

Source: Curso experto legal en Blockchain, Smart Contracts e ICOs – 15 horas (24 – 26 enero 2018) – Blockchain España

Course: Blockchain and Intellectual Property (26-10-2017) (Basic level)

On the 26 October 2017, the EUIPO brought together around 80 people to interact and discuss the implication of Blockchain technology on the world of intellectual property. Participants includes Blockchain experts, national IP offices, right holder representatives and representatives from civil society. The conference convered the basic concepts of the technology, the many aspects of interaction between the technology and intellectual property, 3 practical use cases and a look into the future.

Source: Course: Blockchain and Intellectual Property (26-10-2017) (Basic level)

Technological Sovereignty

Technological Sovereignty, Vol. 2

We deserve to have other technologies, something better than what we nowadays call “Information and Communication Technologies”. This book deals with its psychological, social, political, ecological and economic costs while it relates experiences to create Technological Sovereignty. The authors bring us closer to other ways of desiring, designing, producing and maintaining technologies. Experiences and initiatives to develop freedom, autonomy and social justice while creating autonomous mobile telephony systems, simultaneous translation networks, leaks platforms, security tools, sovereign algorithms ethical servers and appropriate technologies among others. The texts are by Alex Haché, Benjamin Cadon, COATI, Carolina, Kali Kaneko, Loreto Bravo, Maxigas and Margarita Padilla.

Source: Introduction · Soveranía Technológica

Blockchain for Creative Industries | Middlesex University London

The Blockchain for Creative Industries cluster comprises staff from the Faculty of Arts and Creative Industries, as well as from Science and Technology. We explore the disruptive, and enabling potential of blockchain technology for music, photography, art, fashion, film, journalism and gaming. As well as high-quality research outputs, the cluster is committed to teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Areas of interest include new business and economic models; creative entrepreneurship and artistic identity; copyright; visual analytics; and digital forensics. As well as exploring the considerable potential for innovation, we also look at barriers to adoption and possible disadvantages of this new technology – one some have suggested could be as significant as the World Wide Web.

Members of the cluster have been interviewed on behalf of the French Intellectual Property Office, and have taken part in round-table events alongside representatives of the Department of Work & Pensions and the Government Office for Science.

Cluster members have spoken at events organised by Blockchain Storm and the Bitcoin and Blockchain Leadership Forum, and at festivals including the Great Escape and Wilderness. We have also spoken internationally, at events including Distributed: Music in Nashville, USA, and as part of Global Entrepreneurship Week in Bergen, Norway. Cluster members have been interviewed on the BBC and written articles for publications including the Guardian, the Conversation and Distributed magazine.

Our Music on the Blockchain report, published in 2016, received extensive media coverage from publications including Music Week, Music 4.5, International Business Times, Tech City News, Cryptocoin News, City A.M., Fortune magazine, Huffington Post and Record of the Day. The report was launched at Sonos Studios in London, with leading figures in academia and industry.

The cluster is part of the Open Music Initiative, alongside Berklee, MIT, Harvard and UCL.

Watch video
Close

Publications:

Unchaining Access to Justice: The Potential of Blockchain | Insights | HiiL

By Dr. Martin Gramatikov, Senior Justice Sector Advisorand Georgi Chisuse, ScalatorCryptocurrencies, and its underlying blockchain technology, are everywhere today. Bitcoin’s revolutionary breakthrough provoked intensive research into the potential adoption of backend technology into a multitude of fields. Essentially, blockchain is a secure digital ledger which can record almost anything which has value – coins and financial transactions, ID documents and ownership titles, votes and shares, property and contractual rights, positive and negative reviews. It is clear that blockchain technology will transform and probably disrupt many areas of the law in the months and years to come.Based on mutual consensus between all participants and automatic authenticity checks, the decentralized blockchain technology has shown tremendous potential for building independent systems. Thus, the autonomy as well as the transparency of those systems would guarantee a broader access to justice to everyone involved.But is it going to remain a technology geared towards the needs of big business such as banks, insurance, the fintech sector and investors? Can blockchain help the billions of people who need the law for protecting their basic justice needs?Throughout the years, HiiL has asked tens of thousands of people around the world about their justice needs and experiences with access to justice. We find that worldwide, large numbers of women and men encounter legal problems that might have a legal solution. At a global level, people most often need accessible and fair justice journeys for: crime, land problems, disputes with neighbors, family problems, employment and money-related disputes. Problems around ID documents (i.e. birth, citizenship, marriage and death certificates) and welfare benefits are common among the most vulnerable groups.The answer to our question is – Yes, blockchain technology has huge promise for the justice needs of the people. Countries like Estonia, Ghana, Honduras, Ukraine, Sweden, the Indian state Andra Pradesh and Georgia already experiment with registering land titles and ownership rights using blockchain. There is a great hope that this will make land transactions more affordable, transparent and secure.In the field of family justice, there are already examples of e-marriage and marriage certificates encoded in public and private blockchains. The fields most likely to be innovated using blockchain are inheritance, dowry, and prenuptial agreements. Benefits of such innovation include smart contracts which can help women to secure and enforce their rights.Employment is about livelihood. Millions of people need protection against exploitative practices, unfair dismissal, unpaid wages and dangerous working conditions. Employment contracts and their clauses can be registered in a blockchain. Complex schemes of intermediaries can be hold accountable through transparency. Data can be exchanged with labour inspectorates and watchdogs. In Brazil, a startup called CreditDream works on decentralized blockchain applications for universal access to credit.Undoubtedly, there is a great potential for blockchain technologies to deliver just and fair solutions to millions and even billions of people who need justice. The creativity of the industry will lead the way. But there is a need for visionary leadership which steers innovation towards people’s most prevalent and pressing justice needs.

Source: Unchaining Access to Justice: The Potential of Blockchain | Insights | HiiL

WODC | 2815 – Verkennend onderzoek naar de sociale en ethische gevolgen van de Blockchain en hoe de overheid zich hiertoe zou kunnenmoeten verhouden

Blockchain kan beschouwd worden als een nieuwe vorm van gedistribueerde informatietechnologie. De Blockchain-technologie kent vele toepassingen. Een daarvan is Bitcoin, een virtuele munt waarmee via Internet wereldwijd betalingen kunnen worden verricht. Hoewel niet duidelijk is of alle veronderstelde toepassingsmogelijkheden van blockchaintechnologie realiteit zullen worden, heeft het meerwaarde als de overheid zich verdiept in blockchaintechnologie en de mogelijke gevolgen daarvan voor wetgeving. In dit onderzoek worden de (mogelijke) ethische en sociale gevolgen van de Blockchain-technologie in kaart gebracht. Ook wordt nagegaan in hoeverre de overheid zelf Blockchain-technologie zou kunnen inzetten in uitvoering, toezicht, handhaving etc., onder welke voorwaarden en wat dit zou betekenen voor wet- en regelgeving. Het onderzoek is toegezegd aan de Eerste Kamer (Eerste Kamerstukken, Vergaderjaar 2016-2017, 33009, verslag schriftelijk overleg vastgesteld 22 december 2016).Onderzoekgegevens

Source: WODC | 2815 – Verkennend onderzoek naar de sociale en ethische gevolgen van de Blockchain en hoe de overheid zich hiertoe zou kunnenmoeten verhouden

Anticipating Blockchain for Development: Data, Power and the Future – The Connectivity, Inclusion, and Inequality Group

Research on anticipated, contingent and imaginary blockchain-enabled ‘aidlands’ (Mosse 2011) is crucial now: much is at stake. What will the role of blockchain be in identity management in global contexts where population control regimes proliferate to the detriment of the many? Through multi-stakeholder ethnographic work with user communities, the development industry, technical, legal, regulatory and governmental communities, I aim to make a practical intervention in public social science, developing best practice principles or ‘infraethics’ (Floridi 2017) from concrete sociotechnical findings about the specific ways in which DLTs can empower communities in global contexts, how, and what new digital inequalities or unintended consequences arise (cf. for example the energy consumption issue with Bitcoin mining, which is currently a ‘hot’ topic). I have a hunch that working on best practice may involve pointing out when a blockchain isn’t really necessary.

Source: Anticipating Blockchain for Development: Data, Power and the Future – The Connectivity, Inclusion, and Inequality Group

P2Pmodels: Blockchain Orgs for the Collaborative Economy

P2P Models is a large research project to build Blockchain-powered organizations which are decentralized, democratic and distribute their profits, in order to boost a new type of Collaborative Economy. The project has three legs:Infrastructure: Provide a software framework to build decentralized infrastructure for Collaborative Economy organizations that do not depend on central authorities.Governance: Enable democratic-by-design models of governance for communities, whose rules are, at least partially, encoded in the software to ensure higher levels of equality.Economy: Enable value distribution models which are interoperable across organizations, improving the economic sustainability of both contributors and organizations.

Source: P2Pmodels: Blockchain Orgs for the Collaborative Economy

Blockchange

The first phase of Blockchange will seek to test the hypothesis that by applying blockchain attributes to identity management, a trusted digital ID can be created that can benefit, for instance:The estimated 1.1 billion people who are unable to prove their identity to the satisfaction of authorities and other organizations – often excluding them from property ownership, free movement, and social protection as a result;The 1.3 million refugees that are trying to relocate around the world but can’t be identified; andAll the women and girls, who disproportionately struggle to obtain IDs, often the result of barriers related to: freedom of travel, distance, financial costs, time constraints, illiteracy, lack of information and awareness, and lack of support from family members.To become smarter about the application of blockchain technologies for identity, Blockchange will initially seek to:Map, and provide a taxonomy of blockchain technologies that seeks to provide identity;Develop a primer on the potential and challenges of blockchain technologies across the identity life-cycle (such as creation; verification; authentication; and authorization);Map the actual use of identity provided through blockchain technologies for a variety of social good purposes through case studies; andCo-develop a set of (evidence-based) design principles that can guide the further development and use of blockchain for social change.

Source: Blockchange

BACK TO THE FUTURE: THE DECENTRALIZED WEB

We offer case studies of the following decentralized publishing projects:

  • Freedom Box, a system for personal publishing
  • Diaspora, a federated social network
  • Mastodon, a federated Twitter-like service
  • Blockstack, a distributed system for online identity services
  • IPFS (Interplanetary File System), a distributed storage service with a proposed mechanism to incentivize resource sharing
  • Solid (Social Linked Data), a linked-data protocol that could act as a back-end for data sharing between social media networks
  • Appcoins, a digital currency framework that enables users to financially participate in ownership of platforms and protocols
  • Steemit, an online community that uses an appcoin to incentivize development and community participation in a social network