Design of a software architecture supporting business-to-government information sharing to improve public safety and security | SpringerLink

Abstract

To ensure public safety and security, it is vitally important for governments to collect information from businesses and analyse it. Such information can be used to determine whether transported goods might be suspicious and therefore require physical inspection. Although businesses are obliged to report some information, they are reluctant to share additional information for fear of sharing competitively sensitive information, becoming liable and not being compliant with the law. These reasons are often overlooked in the design of software architectures for information sharing. In the present research, we followed a design science approach to develop a software architecture for business-to-government information sharing. Based on literature and a case study, we elicited the requirements an architecture that provides for the sharing of information should meet to make it acceptable to businesses. We then developed the architecture and evaluated it against the requirements. The architecture consists of a blockchain that stores events and rules for information sharing that are controlled by businesses. For each event, two parties use their private keys to encrypt its Merkle root to confirm that they know the data are correct. This makes it easy to check whether information is reliable and whether an event should be accepted. Access control, metadata and context information enable the context-based sharing of information. This is combined with the encryption and decryption of data to provide access to certain data within an organisation.

Source: Design of a software architecture supporting business-to-government information sharing to improve public safety and security | SpringerLink

Blockchain in government: Benefits and implications of distributed ledger technology for information sharing – ScienceDirect

Abstract

Blockchain refers to a range of general purpose technologies to exchange information and transact digital assets in distributed networks. The core question addressed in this paper is whether blockchain technology will lead to innovation and transformation of governmental processes. To address this question we present a critical assessment of the often exaggerated benefits of blockchain technology found in the literature and discuss their implications for governmental organizations and processes. We plea for a shift from a technology-driven to need-driven approach in which blockchain applications are customized to ensure a fit with requirements of administrative processes and in which the administrative processes are changed to benefit from the technology. Having sound governance models are found to be a condition for realizing benefits. Based on a critical assessment we offer directions for further research into the potential benefits of BC applications in e-government and the role of governance of BC architectures and applications to comply with societal needs and public values.

Source: Blockchain in government: Benefits and implications of distributed ledger technology for information sharing – ScienceDirect

Blockchain, Law & Policy workshop February 12, 2018, Amsterdam

The Business Law and Economics Symposium, the Blockchain &
Society Policy Research Lab at IViR, and the Center for Law & Economics at ETH Zurich presents the  Blockchain, Law & Policy workshop.

Date:  February 12th, 2018 (8:30-17:15)

Location:  IViR Documentation Room, Faculty of Law, University of Amsterdam, Roeterseilandcampus – building A, Nieuwe Achtergracht 166, Amsterdam

Program:

8:30-9:00 BREAKFAST
9:00-9:15 Opening statement by Stefan Bechtold & Giuseppe Dari-Mattiacci

Session 1

9:15-10:15 Luis Garicano (LSE): The Governance of Blockchain: Hard Forks, Cryptocurrency and Norms
10:15-10:45 COFFEE BREAK
10:45-11:45 Davide Grossi (Groningen): A Social Choice-Theoretic Analysis of the Stellar Consensus Protocol
11:45-12:45 Stefan Bechtold (ETH Zurich) & Giuseppe Dari-Mattiacci (UvA): Property Without Law: Personalized Property Rights Through New Contracting Technologies

12:45-14:00 LUNCH (served in the conference room)

14:00-14;45 Joris Cramwinckel (Ortec Finance, Rotterdam): Blockchain Technology and Smart Contracts: Potential and Limits, with an Application to Pensions
14:45-15:45 Hermann Elendner (HU Berlin): Liquidity and Resiliency of Crypto-currency Markets

15:45:16:15 COFFEE BREAK
16:15-17:15 Balazs Bodo, Daniel Gervais and Joao Quintais (Amsterdam): Who Needs Copyright When We Have Blockchain and Smart Contracts?

 

See the detailed program and the abstracts here: Blockchain Program 2018

Curso experto legal en Blockchain, Smart Contracts e ICOs – 15 horas (24 – 26 enero 2018) – Blockchain España

Segunda edición del Curso experto Legal en blockchain, Smart Contracts e ICOs del 24 al 26 de enero de 2018Duración: 15 horas24 enero de 9.00-14.3025 enero de 17.00 – 22.0026 de enero de 9.30 a 14.00.Incluye dos Labs Prácticos, un caso de compraventa de vivienda en Smart contract y acceso a la comunidad de conocimiento de Blockchain España.PROGRAMA MÓDULO 1: Tecnología Blockchain, bitcoin, ethereum y principales retos jurídicos.MÓDULO 2: Identidad digitalLAB PRACTICO·         Cómo funciona el acceso·         Explora transacciones en una Blockchain.·         Usa una wallet.MÓDULO 3: Smart contracts.LAB PRACTICO·         Crear un Smart Contract con Solidity: Haz una compraventa de vivienda en Smart ContractMÓDULO 4: ICOS.MÓDULO 5: DAOs.**VER DETALLE DEL PROGRAMA ABAJOA QUIÉN VA DIRIGIDO?·         Abogados y profesionales del derecho.·         Miembros de la administración pública.·         Académicos y docentes.·         Empresas que estén valorando el lanzamiento de un proyecto Blockchain o una ICO.Precio 1.573 Euros (1300 + IVA)Inscripción: Envía un email a blockchainespana@gmail.comCurso presencial en Madrid. Espacio Impact Hub.

Source: Curso experto legal en Blockchain, Smart Contracts e ICOs – 15 horas (24 – 26 enero 2018) – Blockchain España

Course: Blockchain and Intellectual Property (26-10-2017) (Basic level)

On the 26 October 2017, the EUIPO brought together around 80 people to interact and discuss the implication of Blockchain technology on the world of intellectual property. Participants includes Blockchain experts, national IP offices, right holder representatives and representatives from civil society. The conference convered the basic concepts of the technology, the many aspects of interaction between the technology and intellectual property, 3 practical use cases and a look into the future.

Source: Course: Blockchain and Intellectual Property (26-10-2017) (Basic level)

Decentralization in Bitcoin and Ethereum

We have been conducting a longitudinal study of the state of cryptocurrency networks, including Bitcoin and Ethereum. We have just made public our results from our study spanning 2015 to 2017, in a peer-reviewed paper about to be presented at the upcoming Financial Cryptography and Data Security conference in February [1].Here are some highlights from our findings.

Source: Decentralization in Bitcoin and Ethereum

Book-Smart, Not Street-Smart: Blockchain-Based Smart Contracts and The Social Workings of Law | Levy | Engaging Science, Technology, and Society

Book-Smart, Not Street-Smart: Blockchain-Based Smart Contracts and The Social Workings of Law

Karen E. C. Levy

 

Abstract

This paper critiques blockchain-based “smart contracts,” which aim to automatically and securely execute obligations without reliance on a centralized enforcement authority. Though smart contracts do have some features that might serve the goals of social justice and fairness, I suggest that they are based on a thin conception of what law does, and how it does it. Smart contracts focus on the technical form of contract to the exclusion of the social contexts within which contracts operate, and the complex ways in which people use them. In the real world, contractual obligations are enforced through all kinds of social mechanisms other than formal adjudication—and contracts serve many functions that are not explicitly legal in nature, or even designed to be formally enforced. I describe three categories of contracting practices in which people engage (the inclusion of facially unenforceable terms, the inclusion of purposefully underspecified terms, and willful nonenforcement of enforceable terms) to illustrate how contracts actually “work.” The technology of smart contracts neglects the fact that people use contracts as social resources to manage their relations. The inflexibility that they introduce, by design, might short-circuit a number of social uses to which law is routinely put. Therefore, I suggest that attention to the social and relational contexts of contracting are essential considerations for the discussion, development, and deployment of smart contracts.

ts and The Social Workings of Law | Levy | Engaging Science, Technology, and Society